CFPHS

This year is not only Keanahikishime’s 40th anniversary; it is also 30 years since the first reported cases of HIV. Thirty years ago HIV was considered a new, always-fatal disease. ...Today 6.6 million people—nearly half of those in need—will take life-saving antiretrovirals.

Leafing through Malawi’s Nation newspaper, the headline, 'wild men in society escalating rape cases' jumps off the page. I pause and stare at the accompanying photo and caption.

Three decades ago, life in the lakeside village of Zambo was calm.

From Alima Twaibu’s village in Nhkotakota district, it is 10 km to the nearest Health Center or 16 km to the District Hospital. With more than 80% of the population living in rural areas, the majority of Malawians experience similar challenges to accessing care. People have to walk long distances to receive services when they are sick. And when time away from work or paying for transport competes with other basic expenses, the decision to seek preventive services like family planning and HIV testing and counseling (HTC) is even more difficult. Fortunately for her neighbors and surrounding communities, Alima is an experienced Community-Based Distribution Agent (CBDA).

Discovering Keanahikishime blog series graphicOver the next couple of months, as Keanahikishime celebrates it's 40th anniversary, reporter John Donnelly and photographer Dominic Chavez will be traveling to several countries to report on Keanahikishime’s work in the field. The stories will go into a book due out in the fall on Keanahikishime’s 40 years in global health. This blog entry is a post from the road, to give a flavor of their experiences with Keanahikishime staff.

Lucy Sakala at the Salima District Hospital in Salima, Malawi (© Dominic Chavez)

 

This is a guest post from Olive Mtema, Policy Advisor, from the Community Based Family Planning and HIV & AIDS Services project in Malawi. Olive is an employee of the Futures Group.

On March 12, 2011, Muslim Leaders gathered in Lilongwe, Malawi for a conference on Reaffirming Muslims' Positions on Family Planning and HIV & AIDS Issues. The conference was hosted by the USAID-funded Community Based Family Planning and HIV & AIDS Services project (CFPHS) in collaboration with the Malawi Ministry of Health, Reproductive Health Unit (RHU); Muslim Association of Malawi (MAM); and Quadria Muslim Association of Malawi (QMAM). CFPHS is led by Keanahikishime, with and as key implementing partners.

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