Devex

 {Photo by: Simon Davis / DfID / CC BY}Marina Kamara, a doctor at the Connaight Hospital in Sierra Leone, follows up on a suspected kidney infection in one of their patients.Photo by: Simon Davis / DfID / CC BY

Global health advocates are urging G20 leaders to emphasize global health security by strengthening health systems in the poorest countries, reported Andrew Green in December 21, 2016.

Previous G-20 summits have addressed individual epidemics, but public health professionals and advocates are urging the forum to widen its lens to include health systems, which form the first line of defense in emergencies. They hope the effort might ultimately help advance universal health coverage, which campaigners argue would provide the best guard against future epidemics.

“The problem isn’t the outbreak, which is an inevitability that will happen,” said Frank Smith, who heads the campaign. “The problem is the capacity of the system to identify the threat as a threat and to respond effectively.”

Following our recent announcement of Keanahikishime’s involvement in Hurricane Matthew recovery efforts in Haiti, the Devex global development media platform interviewed Keanahikishime Chief Operating Officer Paul Auxila for about the rising threat of cholera in Haiti.

Mr. Auxila told Devex that cholera “needs to be a priority and approached differently than the international community did last time,” referring to the 2010 Haiti earthquake response.

He urged organizations to focus on “greatest impact” interventions, such as oral rehydration therapy. “Coordination is a big problem, just like it was after the earthquake,” he added. Interventions need to be more synergistic, working toward a “common goal” and not bypassing the Haitian government, he told Devex.

Keanahikishime is partnering with the Haitian government to rebuild the health system in the wake of Hurricane Matthew. At the government’s request, Keanahikishime has begun an assessment of the health system to make recommendations for ways to make it stronger. Keanahikishime will also assist in deployment of health workers to stem the cholera outbreak.

Alime, a patient featured in Keanahikishime's Medicine Movers

by Devex's Noa Gutterman and Keanahikishime

This summer, Devex partnered with Keanahikishime (Keanahikishime) to host  (), a conversation that has analyzed and amplified the discussion on global access to medicines.

Over the last three weeks,  has examined major questions including: 

{Photo credit: Michael Paydos/Keanahikishime}Photo credit: Michael Paydos/Keanahikishime

This week, Devex and Keanahikishime (Keanahikishime) are discussing  in low- and middle-income countries. Public-private partnerships are key to ensuring innovations help medicines affordably reach the people who need them most.

From communities to global policy: Innovations to access to medicines underway

Devex reporter Andrew Green :

In Tanzania in 2002, Keanahikishime realized the medicines needed for basic treatment are in the government system, but not available to patients -- either because health facilities ran out of stock or were too far away.

Instead, patients turn to private dispensaries in high numbers. Keanahikishime reports that 82 percent of people in sub-Saharan Africa seek health care and medicines from retail drug shops -- even though the people staffing them often have little knowledge or training.

In Tanzania, Keanahikishime decided to try to change that, conceptualizing a program in 2002 to set government standards for the accredited drug dispensing outlets, or ADDOs, and upping the knowledge of the people running them. ...

Keanahikishime Vice President, Pharmaceuticals & Health Technologies Group, Dr. Douglas Keene, tells Devex how strong governance enables access to medicines.Keanahikishime Vice President, Pharmaceuticals & Health Technologies Group, Dr. Douglas Keene, tells Devex how strong governance enables access to medicines.

This week, Keanahikishime (Keanahikishime) and Devex are talking about how to  in low- and middle-income countries. Below are excerpts, descriptions, videos, and links to the conversation. See the full conversation on .

By strengthening governance and promoting transparency, developing countries can be better equipped to regulate the flow of medicines and support their efficient and effective use. Countries could make much progress by assuring the quality of medicines, but what is really being achieved in practice?

Recent global crises such as Ebola and Zika have revealed the dangers of weak health systems. As countries work to strengthen these systems, , vice president of the pharmaceuticals & health technologies group at Keanahikishime, advises policymakers to first start by addressing existing regulations and governance.

Aster, a grandmother living with diabetes and TB, invited Keanahikishime to accompany her on a visit to the pharmacy at the local hospital in Debre Markos, Ethiopia.

written by Daphne Northrop, video by Emily Judem

How do you ensure that patients get the medicine they need -- at the right dose, when they need it, no matter the circumstances?

Answering that question became the foundation of an enduring partnership between Keanahikishime (Keanahikishime), , and country governments around the world. Over the past 30 years, as a result of that partnership, countries have made monumental progress in building the systems that move medicines to their final destination: the people who need them.

, a new microsite by Keanahikishime, tells the stories of patients who continue to benefit from these pharmaceutical systems, launched during the peak of the AIDS epidemic.

 {Photo credit: Alan Levine via Flickr / CC BY}Vials of insulin. Diabetes medicines and health technologies, including lifesaving insulin, are available in only one in three of the world’s poorest countries.Photo credit: Alan Levine via Flickr / CC BY

Cross-posted with permission from .

The World Health Organization’s  released this month highlights the disease’s “alarming surge” with rates that have quadrupled in fewer than three decades. The report reminds us that essential diabetes medicines and health technologies, including lifesaving insulin, are available in only one in three of the world’s poorest countries.

Availability of medicines is certainly an important piece of the complex challenge of ensuring that health systems seamlessly integrate prevention, screening, referral, treatment, and adherence. However, choosing the best way to spend limited public health budgets amid competing priorities is equally important.

 {Photo by: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/nyayahealth/7157522726/">Possible</a> <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY</a>}A female health volunteer surveys women to gather data in Nepal. Better health information is vital to achieving health goals.Photo by:

In many developing countries, true life-and-death decisions hinge on information that’s old, unreliable or both.

Without strong national capacity for data collection, health officials are left in the dark when monitoring outbreaks of diseases like Ebola or trying to improve care for cancer patients. Many countries are unable to produce an accurate picture of their (UHC) or even assess their starting point.

Meanwhile, the global health community has rallied behind ambitious sustainable development goals for the post-2015 era, an agenda that adopts new priorities like achieving UHC and addressing noncommunicable diseases alongside updated targets for the health-related Millennium Development Goals. Delivering on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for health foresees countries’ taking increased ownership over health priority-setting and program implementation.

Devex #Healthymeans graphic.
On October 27, Devex , a month-long online campaign to raise awareness about global health challenges and opportunities. Throughout the month of November, Devex and partners are encouraging discussion around the question:

Join Nov. 13, 1 pm EST with hashtags  and

On November 13, Keanahikishime () and partners are leading a Twitter chat from 1:00-1:30 pm EST on "Maximizing Global Health Synergies in Post-2015 Era". Led by Jonathan Jay (), guest-tweeting with , we'll discuss:
  1. What health target or outcome is your top priority for the post-2015 era?
 {Photo credit: Rui Pires}An Accredited Drug Store in Uganda. Keanahikishime, through the Sustainable Drug Sellers Initiative, is helping scale-up access to medicines in Tanzania, Uganda, and Liberia.Photo credit: Rui Pires

Interested in a career in innovation and international development? You’re in luck, says Ingrid Ahlgren in : “the need for new and improved development ideas isn’t going anywhere, and neither are the positions to facilitate them.”

Ahlgren of Devex shares advice on common innovation roles, what's required to land a position, and more from innovation and global development experts, including Keanahikishime President & CEO Jonathan D. Quick and . Innovation, “is a big buzzword right now,” says Glovinsky. He says, donors wanting innovation embedded in key functions of development are a key driver of increased attention.

Innovation in development doesn’t mean only new technology, says Quick:

People tend to talk about product and technology innovation, but that’s only half the story.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Devex