“We want to provide excellent services to our patients; the same level of care they would receive in Paris, Thailand, or the United States of America.” - Dr. Lombe Kilamba, an HIV Case Manager at Kilamba-Kiaxi Municipal Hospital

The Government of Angola is working to scale up early diagnosis and treatment of HIV. While the country’s HIV prevalence is lower than many of its neighbors, AIDS-related deaths  between 2010 and 2018. The number of new infections is also on the rise, particularly among young women, and just  living with HIV are receiving treatment.

{LINKAGES Angola's peer educators: Garcia, Kudibanza, Dario, Michel, and Henrique. Photo credit: LINKAGES Angola}LINKAGES Angola's peer educators: Garcia, Kudibanza, Dario, Michel, and Henrique. Photo credit: LINKAGES Angola

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Written by Rafaela Egg, LINKAGES Angola; Ben Eveslage, FHI 360; Denizia Pinto, LINKAGES Angola; & Caitlin Loehr, IntraHealth International

 

“Here they come again with another ‘big idea,’ another innovation, to see how we can improve.” – Dario, community peer educator, Luanda, Angola

 {Photo credit: Igor Dashevskiy}Left to right: Arsen Zhumadilov, Head of Ukraine's Central Procurement Agency, Zoryana Skaletska, Ukrainian Ministry of Health, and Susan Fritz, USAID Mission Director to Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova.Photo credit: Igor Dashevskiy

On October 2, 2019, Ukraine’s Ministry of Health (MOH) opened the doors of its Medical Central Procurement Agency (CPA), a new type of Ukrainian organization driven by a strong vision to improve access to medicines and prevent corruption.

 (Photo Credit: Jawad Jalali)An Afghan nurse washes her hands before taking care of patients in Wazir Akbar Khan hospital, Kabul Afghanistan. (Photo Credit: Jawad Jalali)

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“Rise of the superbugs.” “Global crisis.” “Nightmare bacteria.” “Deadly fungus.”

The media has caught on to the dire threat that antimicrobial resistance (AMR) presents, and it has certainly captured the urgency of the situation.

Global health professionals know this crisis has been years in the making and have been acting accordingly. We know, however, that we cannot contain the spread of AMR without strengthening health systems in low- and middle-income countries, which tend to have weaker surveillance systems for drug use and infectious disease management. Our efforts would be futile. It’s time to take stock of where we are and figure out our focus going forward; we have no time to lose.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

Meet Daniel Gemechu, Keanahikishime Regional Director for the USAID-funded Challenge TB Project in Ethiopia. Keanahikishime has worked in Ethiopia since 2011 to improve the quality of TB care and prevention services. Over the past five years, treatment success rates rose above 90%, with 75% of those suffering from multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) now able to beat the disease after completing their treatment regimens. We asked Dr. Gemechu to reflect on his experience working with Keanahikishime and what remains to be done to eliminate the disease in Ethiopia.

[Dr. Gemechu cross-checks doses taken and doses remaining on TB treatment patient kits at a health center in Oromia region to verify whether treatment is being delivered according to national guidelines.]Dr. Gemechu cross-checks doses taken and doses remaining on TB treatment patient kits at a health center in Oromia region to verify whether treatment is being delivered according to national guidelines.What drives you to fight TB in your home country? 

A cholera patient recovers at a treatment center in Lilongwe District, Malawi. Photo Credit: Erik Schouten/Keanahikishime

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It was January of 1925, and Nome’s children were dying. Diphtheria had struck the Alaskan town, but the curative serum the local doctor needed was in Nenana, nearly 700 miles away.

Sub-zero temperatures meant that shipping the serum by air was not an option, so the governor turned to sled dog teams, which had delivered mail on that route. Over 5 and 1/2 days, 20 mush teams and their human drivers set up a relay and delivered the lifesaving medicine, a trek known as the “Great Race of Mercy”—now commemorated every year in an event called the Iditarod.

The moral: Get help when you need it, no matter how unorthodox.

We need to employ that strategy in global health development by integrating private sector organizations into our health system solutions more often. They operate where governments cannot and are a rich source of flexibility and innovation. When a country’s government is frozen by conflict, natural disasters, financial crisis, or another crippling event, its health care system is all too likely to follow. Health workers flee or fall victim themselves, and hospitals run out of medicine and go dark. Others must step in to fill the void.

Mother and baby await health services at a health center in Mulanje, Malawi. Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/Keanahikishime

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Many women are the bedrock of families yet tend to lack access to and control over resources to ensure a diverse and nutritious diet before, during, and after pregnancy. Luckily, gender sensitive nutrition programming that is integrated with MNCH and reproductive health activities can deliver healthier lives for women, their children, and their families.

Violet, a young mother living in Karonga district in central Malawi, delivered her first baby at a community hospital in September. Throughout her pregnancy, she attended six antenatal care (ANC) visits. Her delivery was smooth and without complication, due to her good health and nutrition. Her husband attended her delivery as her guardian.

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